Gregg
Feb 5, 2017

Space organizing

4 comments

Now that I'm up to 5 bikes, it's starting to be a space issue in my garage. I need to look into some options to better manage this space & the bikes. Yikes.

Malindi
Feb 19, 2017

Gregg, you mentioned that you don't recommend mountain bikes with suspension. Would an old Specialized Rockhopper (no suspension front or back) be a candidate to put some luggage on, or am I asking for a backbreaking experience in that case? I think it could take fatter tires...

Kevin Beretta

Gregg
Feb 19, 2017

Hi Malinda & thx for question.

Although my bike preference for loaded touring is to go no suspension and fatter tires, there are a good number of folks who prefer a hard tail or, uncommon, full suspension. Check out website backpacker.com to see some pics & discussions.

The challenge for your Rockhopper might be the mounts to carry gear, particularly if you plan to go more than one night. The newer bikepacking freme bags are a good option for minimalist camping, but brutally expensive if you are just giving things a try.

That said, if you can get a rack and panniers on the Rockhopper, I'd really strongly recommend just giving it a try on a moderate ride. I know a number of folks (self included) who got going with a variation of whatever they currently have, then, if they really liked it, slowly started to upgrade gear and even bikes over time. Your bike should certainly be tough enough. The challenge will be packing gear.

Let me know if you give it a go and how it works out.

Gregg

Malindi
Feb 22, 2017

Gregg, I do have mounts all around the front and back on the frame. And with that I mean, there are tubular protrusions welded to the frame which have threaded centers, so assume this is where bag mounts would go. I'll have to take a closer look.... hmmm. An excuse to buy more toys :-)

Gregg
Feb 22, 2017

Well - then you're set. The threaded bosses that will be important if you try to mount a rack will be on the front forks near the axel and about half way up, and on the back forks, near the axel again, and also near the top where the diagonal tubes from the axel join the main part of the frame under the seat. There are common options to use clamps (vs the frame bosses) that most racks come with, and bike stores can tell you about.

You're right about more toys. There are some things one needs to get off and running. Some bike stores rent out rack and pannier set ups that can help get people out for intro tours, and also to see if they like it before spending money. You might want to buy at least a rear rack, as that can be useful even around town without hindering trail riding, and then see if you have a friend to lend you a couple of panniers to try things out,

Good luck,

Gregg

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