Nepal & the Fabled Kingdom of Mustang

Past World Cycling Tour - 2014

I'd read about the lost kingdom of Mustang, one of the world's last enclaves of traditional Tibetan Buddhism, snuggled between the mighty Annapurna and Dhaulagiri ranges in the high mountains of north central Nepal. For decades the upper kingdom had been off limits to outsiders, and even today was only accessible with a local guide. So, I rode out to Jomsom, Lower Mustang, teamed up with a guide I'd arranged (on a mountain bike), and rode up to Lo Manthang, the tiny capital of Upper Mustang.

 

This was a high elevation trip, long days up to and over 4,000m. The riding was notable by how often I had to push my bike (partly, this was as I was still adjusting to the high elevation). But it was so worthwhile. Upper Mustang has rich history, but is sparsely populated, in tiny villages along the streams and rivers fed by glacial run-off. Lo Manthang, the ancient capital, was a delight. One could see it poised between the old and new, with a coffee shop beside a monastery school, and a new road south from China, far better than the rough track north from central Nepal.  

World location map | cycle touring Nepal | cycle touring Upper Mustang

Check out the SLIDESHOW

If you hover over the picture below, you'll see forward/backward arrows for navigating.  Click on the slide to open in viewer mode (good to see text when viewing with small mobile screen). Some of the comments were packaged after my visit, and may no longer be current.

Nepal Videos

I'm still exploring the use of video. Alas, it seems I cannot get sound without buying another plug-in (so you'll have to imagine).  Here's a couple of short videos from my Nepal trip.  There are (dim) forward/back page navigation arrows at the sides of the box. The quality may be a little low, but I suspect you'll find them interesting.  Alas - athough these videos work on larger screens, I was not able to get them to work for smaller, mobile (cell-phone) viewing.

Here come the goats - and it's another narrow mountain road. That's Prakash, my guide into Upper Mustang (required to get the permit). Great guy. The dog at the start travelled with us a few days. Alas, we cannot hear the belly- aching 

racket these goats raise 

Nepal & the fabled kingdom of Mustang - Route

I flew into Kathmandu (wow!), then bussed to the adventure and spiritualism tourist destination of Pokhara to the west. Biked on pretty decent road (hot and hilly, though) to the town of Beni, on the lower stretches of the holy Kali Gandaki River, which calls out to Buddhist and Hindu pilgrims. I followed the Kali Gandaki for much of my ride - it is the only source of holy fossils called shaligrams, without which certain temple to the god Vishnu can be consecrated. The ride north to Jomson followed part of the famous Anapurna trekking circuit, and I met hikers overnighting in tiny Tatopeni. The ride was tough, rugged road and lots of climbing.

Jomson, altitude 2,700m, is the gateway from Lower to Upper Mustang. I met up with Prakash (and mountain bike), my guide, in Jomson. I got really lucky with Prakash, as he was able and patient, even when I was dragging along for a few days until I acclimatized to the high altitude. 

 

Lo Manthang was worth the all the effort, a modest (one can walk about the main town in half an hour) walled city from an earlier age, a number of ancient monasteries, and the critical barley harvest underway.

Then, Prakash and I turned around and rode back, with a notable side trip along high altitude trails to Gar Gompa, which calls itself the first ever Tibetan Buddhism monastery, and the remote village of Dakmar, situated under red cliffs which local legend has it were stained when the illustrious Padma Sambhawa killed the demon which led to the founding of Gar Gompa.

Cycle touring route map | Nepal & Upper Mustang

Caution - Safety First:

This website does not encourage anyone to undertake activities in the backwoods without considering fully issues of safety, access and readiness. There are no guarantees with any information provided in this website.  Please read  the FAQs, research further as appropriate, and use your judgement at all times